The Schoole of Skil: Containing Two Bookes

The Schoole of Skil: Containing Two Bookes. Thomas Hill.
The Schoole of Skil: Containing Two Bookes
The Schoole of Skil: Containing Two Bookes
The Schoole of Skil: Containing Two Bookes
The Schoole of Skil: Containing Two Bookes
The Schoole of Skil: Containing Two Bookes
Published posthumously by Jaggard
The Schoole of Skil: Containing Two Bookes

London: Printed by T. Judson, for W. Jaggard, 1599. First edition. Two parts in one octavo volume (185 x 142 mm).Continuous pagination. [6], 267, [1, blank], [2, table of contents] pp. Lacking initial blank [sig. "A"]. With Spherical woodcut device on title-page, and numerous woodcut illustrations, diagrams and initials throughout. Half 19th-Century maroon morocco over cloth boards. Spine lettered and stamped in gilt. Edges dyed red. Edges a bit rubbed. Inner hinges cracked but firm. Top margin of title-page trimmed close, just touching first word. Fore-edge of leaf D5 frayed. Some marginal dampstaining to pages 49-56 and 233-final leaf. Pages 118-119 misnumbered 102-103, and 122-123 misnumbered 106-107. Leaves M5 and M6 misbound between M2 and M3, but all leaves present and complete. Leaf edges around "Table of contents" a bitdarkened and last leaf of "Table" with a repaired marginal tear, not affecting text. This has been the only copy at auction in the past 30 years. All English 16th-Century books on astronomy are rare.

"Apart from Blundeville, already mentioned, the only other 16th century astronomical writer of any significance who explicitly rejected the Copernican system was Thomas Hill, who died about 1575." (Russel ). In The Schoole of Skil, Hill writes "Aristarchus Samius, which was 261 years before the birth of Christ, took the earth from the middle of the world, and . . . [put it in motion] about the sun, which he feigned to stand in the middle of the world as immoveable, after the manner of the fixed stars. The like argument doth that learned Copernicus apply unto his demonstrations." Hill alludes to the fact that heliocentrism was an idea both ancient and familiar; although he would argue against the Copernican heliocentric model, he would go on to use Copernicus' calculations for various astronomical values, including the length of the solar year.

ESTC S104125. STC 13502.
(Item #3030)

Price: $9,500