Traits of Science and Invention, Designed Chiefly as Incentives to Inquiry...

(Item #5340) Traits of Science and Invention, Designed Chiefly as Incentives to Inquiry. Women in STEM, Barbara Willett.
Traits of Science and Invention, Designed Chiefly as Incentives to Inquiry...
Traits of Science and Invention, Designed Chiefly as Incentives to Inquiry...
Traits of Science and Invention, Designed Chiefly as Incentives to Inquiry...
Traits of Science and Invention, Designed Chiefly as Incentives to Inquiry...
Traits of Science and Invention, Designed Chiefly as Incentives to Inquiry...
Traits of Science and Invention, Designed Chiefly as Incentives to Inquiry...
Traits of Science and Invention, Designed Chiefly as Incentives to Inquiry...
Introducing juvenile readers to writing, printing, navigation, and time-telling as key inventions humans have used to connect with each other
Traits of Science and Invention, Designed Chiefly as Incentives to Inquiry...

London: Whitaker and Co., 1834. First edition. Original publisher's cloth with gilt to spine. All edges gilt. Green endpapers. Measuring 160 x 100mm and collating complete: xii, 204. Archival reinforcement to crown of spine retaining original cloth; small splits along outer joints with binding remaining tight and square. Corners bumped and some bubbling to cloth of boards. Two later ownership signatures to front endpaper. Light scattered foxing throughout and one small ticket loosely inserted leaving faint offsetting. In all, a charming copy of a scarce book, OCLC reports five copies in libraries, all in the UK.

In her introduction, Barbara Willett presents herself as living "a life devoted to the instruction of youth." Whether a schoolmistress or governess she does not clarify; but she explains that it was for the benefit and at the request of these "young friends" that she has compiled the present work. Modest in scope, it presents the reader with several key inventions in Western history: letter writing, printing, navigation, arms, and time-telling. Though seemingly disparate, she shows how each field was born of a human desire to build social connections through the dissemination of ideas or the traveling of distances. She provides some social context for these -- including some of the negative historical aspects such as imperialism and war.

At its release, the Gentleman's Magazine reviewer deemed it a "very useful little book showing the rise and progress of most of the arts of life" (1835). For readers now, it gives insight both into how juvenile educators were presenting complex concepts to young students as well as to what extent this information was presented as civic praise or critique.
(Item #5340)

Price: $1,500