The Novelist's Magazine (Vol. XVII)

(Item #5193) The Novelist's Magazine (Vol. XVII). Francois Salignac de la Mothe- Fenelon, Treyssac De Vergy, Eliza Haywood.
The Novelist's Magazine (Vol. XVII)
The Novelist's Magazine (Vol. XVII)
The Novelist's Magazine (Vol. XVII)
The Novelist's Magazine (Vol. XVII)
The Novelist's Magazine (Vol. XVII)
The Novelist's Magazine (Vol. XVII)
The Novelist's Magazine (Vol. XVII)
The Novelist's Magazine (Vol. XVII)
A contrasting blend of sentimental sensation and decided realism
The Novelist's Magazine (Vol. XVII)

London: Harrison & Co., 1785. First edition. Containing:

Fenelon, Francois Salignac de la Mothe-. Telemachus. Later edition.

De Vergy, Treyssac. Henrietta, Countess Osenvor. A Sentimental Novel. In a Series of Letters to Lady Susannah Fitzroy. Second edition in English.

Haywood, Eliza. The History of Jemmy and Jenny Jessamy. Fourth Edition.

Contemporary calf with gilt and morocco to spine. Marbled endpapers. Measuring 207 x 125mm and collating complete including full titles and all plates (14 in total, some bound out of order) : [4], xii, 13-230; [6], 7-69, [1, blank]; [2], 4-226. Some rubbing and shelfwear to spine with loss to extremities; joints cracked but holding. Armorial bookplate to front pastedown. Internally fresh. Appearing together in 1785 in The Novelist's Magazine, both De Vergy and Haywood's novels used the sentimental form to present far more controversial topics; and here they are mated with Fenelon's Telemachus, a work initially appearing in English in the 17th century and presenting a specific standard of manhood. Early editions of both the De Vergy and Haywood texts remain scarce, but De Vergy's particularly so. ESTC reports only 3 surviving copies of the first edition in English of De Vergy and only 15 of this second edition; no first editions appear in the modern auction record, and this second edition last appeared in 1985.

In an April 1769 article in Town and Country Magazine, a reviewer of diplomat and adventurer Treyssac De Vergy's early work declared that "this writer imitates Rousseau and Richardson. His performance is not without merit, and we might commend it to the ladies if there were not some scenes too luxuriant for the eye of delicacy." De Vergy's use of the sentimental genre to convey more graphic content to a largely female audience continued throughout his career; and in some senses, he was able to get his works into women's hands because he participated in a movement wherein "narrators had become increasingly less reliable; heroes became men of feeling; heroines were not subject to rape and their distresses had become more 'delicate'" (Park). In such circumstances, women's power, desire, and pleasure could gain more space.

De Vergy's epistolary novel makes an interesting pairing with Eliza Haywood's. The final work of this feminist author, The History of Jemmy and Jenny Jessamy is decidedly unsentimental. Rather than depicting its characters swept away by romance and feeling, the novel considers middle class marriage and courtship through a most realistic lens. Slow paced and cautious, it "revolves around Jenny and Jemmy's long-delayed marriage, as they decide to wait and see if their affection for each other is genuine, and as objects arise" (Richetti). Under consideration is not only the practicalities of how two people's personalities shape a marriage, but also the realities a woman must consider before linking herself to a man who may be rash and irresponsible in his own passions.

ESTC T91566, T36092 and T76068.
(Item #5193)

Price: $850