Report of Mrs. Helen Hunt Jackson and Abbot Kinney on the Mission Indians in 1883. Abbreviated

Report of Mrs. Helen Hunt Jackson and Abbot Kinney on the Mission Indians in 1883. Abbreviated. Helen Hunt Jackson, Abbot Kinney.
Report of Mrs. Helen Hunt Jackson and Abbot Kinney on the Mission Indians in 1883. Abbreviated
Report of Mrs. Helen Hunt Jackson and Abbot Kinney on the Mission Indians in 1883. Abbreviated
Report of Mrs. Helen Hunt Jackson and Abbot Kinney on the Mission Indians in 1883. Abbreviated
Report of Mrs. Helen Hunt Jackson and Abbot Kinney on the Mission Indians in 1883. Abbreviated
Report of Mrs. Helen Hunt Jackson and Abbot Kinney on the Mission Indians in 1883. Abbreviated
Report of Mrs. Helen Hunt Jackson and Abbot Kinney on the Mission Indians in 1883. Abbreviated
A report of racist policies shaping the treatment of California tribes, and a call for legal justice on behalf of First Nations peoples
Report of Mrs. Helen Hunt Jackson and Abbot Kinney on the Mission Indians in 1883. Abbreviated

Boston: Press of Stanley and Usher, 1887. First Thus. Original printed wraps with a bit of soiling and foxing to the edges; some loss to paper at the foot of spine and upper corner of front wrap, causing some soiling to the upper margin of page 1. Upper corner of all pages bent. Complete in 37 pages and internally toned but otherwise unmarked. The first abbreviated publication of the 1883 Report on the Condition and Needs of the Mission Indians of California, both the original and this edition are quite scarce. OCLC reports only 16 hardcopies at libraries. And while the 1883 original does not appear in the modern auction record, the present has sold only three times in the last century (1976, 1975, and 1946). This is the only example on the market.

Novelist, poet, essayist, journalist, and activist for the improved treatment of Indigenous peoples of the U.S. "Her greatest achievement was her pioneering work for Indian rights. After hearing the Ponca chief Standing Bear speak about the dispossessed Plains tribes, she vowed to write an expose of the government maltreatment of Indians. Her months of research in the Astor Library of New York resulted in A Century of Dishonor, a copy of which Jackson presented to every U.S. Congressman. This is an impassioned account of the various tribes since white contact, beginning with a discussion on the rights of sovereignty and occupancy, and ending with massacres of native peoples. It shocked the public, and within a year, the powerful Indian Rights Association was born, followed by the Dawes Act of 1884" (Blain and Grundy). As with her previous works of fiction and poetry, Jackson chose to publish under her initials H.H. in order to avoid revealing her real identity due to significant backlash from white people who saw her work as anti-American.

However, Jackson's horror over government treatment of Indigenous communities would shape the rest of her life, leading her to become a public voice on behalf of tribal rights. By 1883, her Report on the Condition and Needs of the Mission Indians of California would be the first publication to bear her full name. Appointed by the U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs to work with fellow agent Abbot Kinney to "report on the Mission Indians' locations and conditions," the document Jackson and Kinney submitted served as an expose on the harms enacted on these tribes, and the government's responsibility to send extensive aid to misplaced and mistreated peoples. "The Report on the Conditions and Needs of the Mission Indians of California...would ultimately be used by Native American groups such as the Women's International Indian Association and the Indian Rights Association...to influence reform legislation" long after Jackson's death (Colorado). This abbreviated publication, produced in easily shareable and transmissible form, aided in spreading her work to such groups.

BAL 10501.
(Item #4409)

Price: $2,750