A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade

A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade. Abolition, Ann Yearsley.
A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade
A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade
A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade
A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade
A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade
"The poem insistently forces a choice from the reader: to oppose, sympathise, and react" to the enslavement of other human beings
A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade

London: G.G. J. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, 1788. First edition. Rebound in modern full crushed morocco with gilt to spine and boards, original endpapers bound in. A wide-margined copy measuring 190 x 240mm (pages). Front endpaper with several small paper repairs to the fore-edge and small closed tear near the gutter. Evidence of an early ownership signature erased on the lower title page. Slight sunning along the upper margins of several pages, but lacking the foxing so typical of the period. Collating [4], 30: complete. Selling at auction only once in the past 43 years and reported at only 10 U.S. institutions according to ESTC, this early and important abolitionist poem is quite rare. The present is the only copy on the market.

"Being convinced that your Ideas of Justice and Humanity are not confined to one Race of Men, I have endeavored to lead you to the Indian Coast," Ann Yearsley begins, urging her patron and her readers toward ethical and emotional sympathy with her cause. Hers was among the earliest and most notable of women's abolitionist literature, all the more attention-grabbing because of the author's identity. "Ann Yearsley introduced a different social reality into 18th century British literature: that of a laboring class woman who fought for artistic recognition and economic independence; who supported the French Revolution and the rights of British peasants, who allied with, fought on behalf of, and showed compassion for abused men and women around the world, with a message, always, to fight back. Thus she was the first writer in English not only to use gender, the rural proletarian class, and slavery as social categories in her writing, but, even more remarkably, she regarded them as issues of comparable priority" (Ferguson). Impoverished from birth, Yearsley witnessed her own mother die from starvation; and for much of her life, she herself suffered from penury and only barely managed to feed her family. Yet she did not withdraw from the world, or see her pains as solely individual but rather a larger network of communal inequity that should encourage empathy. Creating the protagonist Luco, who is captured, torn from his family and home, and enslaved, she tried to instill these feelings in others as well -- others who, like her neighbors in Bristol, witnessed the slave trade in their own ports. And she did not shy away from depicting physical in addition to emotional atrocities, as Luco's act of self-defense in striking a Christian colonial slave-driver results in prolonged torture and execution. "The poem insistently forces a choice from the reader: to oppose, sympathise, and react" (Ferguson).

ESTC T96948.
(Item #3952)

Price: $6,500