The Constitution. A Title-Deed to Woman's Franchise. A Letter to Charles Sumner. in The Golden Age Tracts. No. 2

The Constitution. A Title-Deed to Woman's Franchise. A Letter to Charles Sumner. in The Golden Age Tracts. No. 2. Women's Suffrage, Theodore Tilton.
The Constitution. A Title-Deed to Woman's Franchise. A Letter to Charles Sumner. in The Golden Age Tracts. No. 2
The Constitution. A Title-Deed to Woman's Franchise. A Letter to Charles Sumner. in The Golden Age Tracts. No. 2
The Constitution. A Title-Deed to Woman's Franchise. A Letter to Charles Sumner. in The Golden Age Tracts. No. 2
The Constitution. A Title-Deed to Woman's Franchise. A Letter to Charles Sumner. in The Golden Age Tracts. No. 2
The Constitution. A Title-Deed to Woman's Franchise. A Letter to Charles Sumner. in The Golden Age Tracts. No. 2
An early articulation of the argument that Anthony and Stanton would use in the Declaration of Women's Rights, written by a key ally
The Constitution. A Title-Deed to Woman's Franchise. A Letter to Charles Sumner. in The Golden Age Tracts. No. 2

New York: The Golden Age, 1871. First edition. Original self-wraps with title to front. 17 pages measuring 102 x 160mm. Library label and stamp of Sheldon Art Museum to blank portion of title page; occasional foxing or staining, largely confined to the preliminaries. Bottom front corner a bit crumpled and chipped. Splitting at bottom of spine but altogether holding well. A rare survivor of suffrage ally Theodore Tilton's argument in support of women's citizenship and voting rights based in the 14th Amendment. OCLC reports only 12 institutionally held copies, with this being the sole copy on the market.

As the U.S. centennial of 1876 approached, the National Woman Suffrage Association began a fresh campaign for women's equality. Rather than arguing for a new amendment granting women's suffrage, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and their cohort asserted that women already had the right to vote under the 14th Amendment. In the present pamphlet, Tilton -- an important journalist and abolitionist -- advocates on the women's behalf. "Women being citizens, what are their rights as citizens?" Tilton asks. Listing a number of rights and responsibilities falling to women as a result of their citizenship -- the ability to get passports, for example, or the duty to pay taxes -- he draws attention to the hypocrisy of denying other rights such as the vote to that same group. Voting is "one of the privileges and immunities of citizenship," and while the Constitution itself failed to define citizenship clearly, the 14th and 15th Amendments resolved this: "all persons born or naturalized in the United States." To wit, "I do not hesitate to say that when the slaves of our country became citizens, they took their place in the body politic as a component part of the people entitled to equal rights and under the protection of these two guardian principles; first, that all just government stands on the consent of the governed, and secondly that taxation without representation is tyranny...the doctrine which you have here applied to negroes, I ask that you apply to women." An important example of men's advocacy and alliance with the women's movement, and an early sample of the argument that Anthony and Stanton would ultimately articulate in the Declaration of Women's Rights five years later.

Krichmar 2061.
(Item #3208)

Price: $1,450