The Baby's Mind: A Study for College Women. A paper presented to the Association of Collegiate Alumnae

The Baby's Mind: A Study for College Women. A paper presented to the Association of Collegiate Alumnae. Miss Millicent W. Shinn.
The Baby's Mind: A Study for College Women. A paper presented to the Association of Collegiate Alumnae
The Baby's Mind: A Study for College Women. A paper presented to the Association of Collegiate Alumnae
The Baby's Mind: A Study for College Women. A paper presented to the Association of Collegiate Alumnae
The Baby's Mind: A Study for College Women. A paper presented to the Association of Collegiate Alumnae
The Baby's Mind: A Study for College Women. A paper presented to the Association of Collegiate Alumnae
On women's place in the scholarly study of child development, a lecture presented by the first female PhD from Berkeley
The Baby's Mind: A Study for College Women. A paper presented to the Association of Collegiate Alumnae

[N.P.]: [Association of Collegiate Alumnae], 1894. Offprint. Series II, No 52 of the association's serial. 11, [1, blank]: complete. Disbound but holding together well. Two stab-holes near the gutter of the document, affecting some text. Offsetting near spine and to lower margin of first leaf. Small closed tears to bottom margin of rear wrap. Previous ownership signature of Ellen P. Carson to top corner of first page. A scarce pamphlet on child psychology by the first woman PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, the only one copy of the present work is listed on OCLC.

Millicent Shinn, the first woman to earn a PhD from Berkeley and the eleventh overall in the U.S., began her career as a child psychologist at home, after the birth of her daughter Ruth. Shinn compiled over three years of data on her child, in a frame similar to that of researcher Wilhelm Preyer, which she released. "As a result of this record Shinn was invited to speak at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893...as a result of her presentation, Shinn received several invitations for graduate study at several prestigious schools," and she chose her alma mater of Berkeley in hopes that she could draw attention to their progressive program (Feminist Voices). Her cutting-edge work on child development dove-tailed with an increasing commitment to women's rights. During her time at Berkeley she both published influential work such as The Biography of a Baby, she also produced articles such as The Marriage Rate of College Women, which explained educated women's lower marriage rates as a result of increased financial independence and a greater ability to be discriminating in choice of a mate. The present lecture is a prime example of Shinn using her position in her academic field to carve out greater space for women; for while she discusses advances in studying child development, she also decries the barriers to women's entry into the field. "The great growth of graduate work in American universities and the large number of men in them looking eagerly for new chances of research make it sure than abundance of our trained workers will soon be in the field...Now what reason is there that women should not be among these?...The way is to open the first step, in the graduate courses now unavailable in biology and psychology...It is to the younger women of this Association that such a choice is open." Shinn acknowledges that many educated women did not have access to degrees, then became mothers whose domestic labor prevented continued education as doors began to open. To women capable of pursuing degrees and entering the psychology, Shinn makes a call to action and posits that their perspective and expertise will continue to improve the field.
(Item #3190)

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