A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits...By a Friend to Youth

A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits...By a Friend to Youth. Sarah Hoare.
A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits...By a Friend to Youth
A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits...By a Friend to Youth
A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits...By a Friend to Youth
A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits...By a Friend to Youth
A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits...By a Friend to Youth
A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits...By a Friend to Youth
A charming survivor in boards of this scarce literary-scientific collaboration among women
A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits...By a Friend to Youth

Bristol: Philip Rose, [1826]. First edition. Original drab boards in almost Fine condition, excepting for a small nick to the center of the spine and some slight splitting to the joints near the foot of the spine. Original endpapers. Bookplate of J.O. Edwards to front pastedown. Contemporary annotated slips tipped in between pages 34-35 an 56-57 and in-text notations in the same hand to pages 54 and 124. Else internally clean, nearly unfoxed, and wide-margined. Collates xi, [1, blank], 134: complete including title. The only first edition on the market, OCLC locates this title at only 10 institutions. A charming survivor in boards of a scarce literary-scientific collaboration between two women.

When Sarah Hoare's botanical poems first appeared, they accompanied the 1818 edition of Priscilla Wakefield's An Introduction to Botany. Appearing here separately for the first time, A Poem on the Pleasures and Advantages of Botanical Pursuits was produced with the goal of encouraging young people and especially women toward the study of science. "To Wakefield's work I acknowledge myself much indebted: it was the first book of its kind that I had read on the subject; and I still feel grateful to the author for having rendered a study, which had before been considered abstruse and difficult, so pleasant and familiar," she writes in her introduction, continuing, "The hours passed...in pursuit of Botany I place among the most agreeable of my life." Indeed, when Wakefield's Botany first appeared in 1796, it broke new ground as the first elementary science book written by a woman; and Wakefield's own mission aligned with Hoare's here, in wanting to invite boys and girls equally into the study of science. A Quaker and a botany teacher, Hoare also urges her readers to take her book as a mere starting point -- something to ignite curiosity that drives them toward further study. And she particularly speaks to mothers, who gain a new opportunity to learn from books like these. "On the subject of education I would in a particular manner address you who are mothers. You are placed in a situation of awful responsibility...Daughters are for the most part considered the as the exclusive charge of the mother...It will be of great importance to them that you are worthy, sensible, and well informed." Containing the botanical and scientific poems, accompanied by a miscellany showcasing her authorial talents.
Near Fine (Item #3057)

Price: $1,750