Autograph letter to his publisher about their film collaboration, getting materials for a limited edition pamphlet

Autograph letter to his publisher about their film collaboration, getting materials for a limited edition pamphlet. Frank Stanford.
Autograph letter to his publisher about their film collaboration, getting materials for a limited edition pamphlet
Autograph letter to his publisher about their film collaboration, getting materials for a limited edition pamphlet
Autograph letter to his publisher about their film collaboration, getting materials for a limited edition pamphlet
With emphasis on his goal of producing "a small pamphlet in very limited edition: one hundred copies, one hundred fifty pages. I have a good ms of old & new poems, 3/4's of which are done"
Autograph letter to his publisher about their film collaboration, getting materials for a limited edition pamphlet

[Rogers, Arkansas]: November 30 [1973]. 3 page Autograph Letter Signed on three sheets of 8.5 x 11" paper. Original trifold lines. Accompanied by transmittal envelope with author and recipient's addresses and year stamp. Written to his publisher Irv Broughton during their work on a documentary film about American authors, Stanford addresses the practicalities of their work and makes plans for producing a limited edition book.

In the face of Broughton's career struggles, following his department's decision against offering tenure, Stanford encourages his publisher to focus on more positive projects. "If I may make a suggestion, unless you are intending to appeal and stay either in that area or at U. of W. why don't you _dive_ into everything you are doing; write as many poems as you can, not bothering to submit them, edit the film on Eberhart to your final liking, work on the film issue of MMR, get another MMR with just poetry out, do my long poem book, get a bound notebook and start culling and accumulating your notes on film (everything), pul all your mss. in a box, either write a new or finish an old poem every day, and know that I will have everything you've asked for as soon as humanly possible."

Indeed, Stanford is in a business state of mind, organizing projects and keeping track of progress on his end. He discusses the possibility of whether they can interview Eudora Welty "if she will allow it...she'll be figeting to get back to her privacy & time." He updates Broughton on "a small pamphlet in very limited edition: one hundred copies, one hundred fifty pages. I have a good ms of old & new poems, 3/4's of which are done." He worries as they progress about cost, given that "after the first of the year, as you know, the price of paper will go sky high. The printer suggested I buy the text paper & covers _now_." He admits that he's purchased some material and worries whether "I can still get my money back." From here, he outlines what would go into the book. "Don't worry about the 150 page length. 20 drawings will take up 40 pages; since the poems range in dates, I've decided to use the mss. titles as subtitles, and there are 10 of those which mean 20 pages; 80 short pages of poetry, not so much type as that; 10 pages for title and acknowledge & contents, leeway."

A rare surviving document tracking Stanford's progress in his work, and the practical decisions being made to bring his poetry to the reading public.
(Item #3014)

Price: $5,500