Autograph Letter Signed to his publisher about finding balance between his day job and his writing

Autograph Letter Signed to his publisher about finding balance between his day job and his writing. Frank Stanford.
Writing to his editor about his land-surveying work and progress on their film, leading up to one of his most prolific years
Autograph Letter Signed to his publisher about finding balance between his day job and his writing

[Eureka Springs, Arkansas]: June 11 [1973]. One page autograph letter signed on a sheet measuring 8.5 x 11". Written fully in green ink by Stanford to his publisher and friend Irv Broughton, with whom he had a close collaboration throughout his all too brief career.

Likely written in 1973, as Stanford and Broughton began work on their documentary film It Wasn't a Dream, It Was a Flood. This letter provides insight into how Stanford's professional and personal lives blended together, making his art an integral part of his whole life. Beginning with the pair's business, Stanford reports to Broughton that he "promise[s] to have a new interview to you sometime in July," but explains that his time has been drawn elsewhere by financial necessity. "Working outside 10-12 hours a day. Sorry I haven't written, but you have been on my mind as I climb the mtns, search the fields for cornerstones. Earning all this living -- I am very happy doing it -- bites into my time, but I've managed to FINISH several stories, poems, short screenplays." During this time, Stanford was supporting himself and his girlfriend (later wife) Ginny by doing land surveying. It was an activity that was both physically taxing but creatively inspiring for Stanford, whose poetry drew from his deep connection to Southern landscapes and people. Indeed, as he moved into 1974, Stanford would release some of his most influential works through Broughton's Mill Mountain Press.

Seeking to draw Ginny into their collaboration, Stanford continues, "The girl I am living with is a good photographer and a great artist. Her drawings are wonderful...Do enquire about her work, possibility of using some of it." But, ultimately it is the film that takes up his focus, and that is where he concludes. "I'll be ready to do the film at the end of summer. I can work on your films anytime."

An interesting letter at the start of Stanford's literary success, drawing together two key figures who helped shape his career.
(Item #3004)

Price: $2,500