Open Discussion on the Susan B. Anthony Amendment. In Congressional Union Hall, 13 East 41st Street

Open Discussion on the Susan B. Anthony Amendment. In Congressional Union Hall, 13 East 41st Street. Susan B. Anthony Amendment, Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage.
Open Discussion on the Susan B. Anthony Amendment. In Congressional Union Hall, 13 East 41st Street
A rare surviving broadside calling activists to rally around the newly named Susan B. Anthony Amendment for woman suffrage
Open Discussion on the Susan B. Anthony Amendment. In Congressional Union Hall, 13 East 41st Street

[New York]: Allied Trades Council, November 11, [1915]. First edition. Broadside measuring 152 x 228mm and accompanied by transmittal envelope dated 1915 from the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage to Miss Clarice Livingston. With original fold lines to fit envelope. A Fine, beautifully preserved copy of this scarce pamphlet, the only one on the market with no copies reported at institutions according to OCLC. It has never before appeared at auction.

Following the deaths of NWSA leaders Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony almost a decade earlier, the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage was founded by Alice Paul and Lucy Burns in 1913 to focus solely on the mission of achieving a federal amendment for women's suffrage. Shifting toward more militant tactics inspired by Emmeline Pankhurst and the UK suffragettes of the WSPU, members of the CUWS introduced large-scale protests, pickets, and other direct actions into their campaign. After almost 70 years of effort and mass frustration among activists, the goal was to effectively use civil disobedience as a constant and visible reminder of women's ongoing oppression. Featuring Mrs. Harriot Stanton Blatch, daughter of the late Elizabeth Cady Stanton, as the headlining speaker, this November 1915 meeting also included male allies willing to stand up and advocate for women's equality. Even the more aggressive language of their lecture titles reflect the shifting attitudes of the times -- for example Stanton Blatch's "The New Attack on Congress and How to Win," and George Creel's "A Protest Against Pussy-Foot Methods." Another strategic move, highly visible here, was the naming of the proposed amendment: The Susan B. Anthony Amendment. For the bulk of the movement, activists had identified their proposed suffrage amendment by the next available amendment number. This meant that promotional and protest materials continuously changed, calling it the 16th, 17th, and 18th Amendment as time passed and suffrage didn't. Yet the language of the proposed amendment had always been consistent and to the point: "The Right of Citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex." To the CUWS, this was a rhetorical failure; activists needed a strong, stable, identifiable title to rally around -- and what better to serve as anchor than the name of the most publicly recognizable American suffrage orator? An exceptional surviving piece of ephemera documenting a critical turning point that made it possible for the Susan B. Anthony Amendment to become the 19th Amendment.

Not in Krichmar.
Fine (Item #2840)

Price: $4,500