No Sex in Education; or. An Equal Chance for Both Girls and Boys

No Sex in Education; or. An Equal Chance for Both Girls and Boys. Eliza Bisbee Duffey, Mrs. E. B. Duffey.
No Sex in Education; or. An Equal Chance for Both Girls and Boys
No Sex in Education; or. An Equal Chance for Both Girls and Boys
No Sex in Education; or. An Equal Chance for Both Girls and Boys
No Sex in Education; or. An Equal Chance for Both Girls and Boys
No Sex in Education; or. An Equal Chance for Both Girls and Boys
No Sex in Education; or. An Equal Chance for Both Girls and Boys
"The questions of the equal and co-education of the sexes have drifted uppermost today...the present age cannot postpone action"
No Sex in Education; or. An Equal Chance for Both Girls and Boys

Philadelphia: J. M. Stoddart & Co, [1874]. First edition. Original publisher's cloth binding with gilt to spine and blind embossing to boards. Gentle shelfwear to crown and foot of spine; slight rubbing and a small tear to cloth on the rear board. Brown coated endpapers. Collating [1], 139, [2, blank], 6 pages: complete. An internally neat copy, the textblock is clean and tight. An important argument for equal access to education, this title is scarce in trade and institutions; it is the only copy on the market and last appeared at auction over a century ago, in 1910.

At the release of his controversial book Sex in Education, Dr. E. H. Charles Clarke sparked a series of important and strongly worded rebuttals to his argument that education caused physical harm to girls. Alongside Julia Ward Howe's Sex and Education, Eliza Bisbee Duffey's No Sex in Education advocated for social and legal changes that would give girls equal access to rigorous education. Drawing on her reputation as the author of the medical guide What Women Should Know, she refutes Clarke's position in the strongest terms. "Very long study and experience have led me to a conclusion precisely opposite to that advanced by Dr. Clarke -- that is, instead of discovering that the physical ills of woman result from her following a man's methods of life and study, I have become convinced that they originate from , and are afterwards aggravated by, a course of life which recognizes an element of imagined female weakness." For Duffey, the solution can only come from opening the gates of intellectual and physical stimulation to girls as well as boys; and she asserts that changes to the current system should be immediate. "The questions of the equal and co-education of the sexes have drifted uppermost today, and seem to be forcing themselves to a solution. The present age cannot postpone action; it must take a definite and decided stand in the matter, and it remains to be seem whether it is to make an advance movement or put its seal of sanction upon the dwarfed and inefficient systems of the past." In the chapters that follow, Duffey traces the history of the current educational system, examines the physical similarities of boys and girls, considers European models of coeducation, and provides extensive testimony for her proposed reforms. An important and effective work advocating for educational equality.
Near Fine (Item #2489)

Price: $1,050