Paradise Lost. A Poem in Ten Books. The Author John Milton.

Paradise Lost. A Poem in Ten Books. The Author John Milton. John Milton.
Paradise Lost. A Poem in Ten Books. The Author John Milton.
Paradise Lost. A Poem in Ten Books. The Author John Milton.
Paradise Lost. A Poem in Ten Books. The Author John Milton.
Paradise Lost. A Poem in Ten Books. The Author John Milton.
Paradise Lost. A Poem in Ten Books. The Author John Milton.
Paradise Lost. A Poem in Ten Books. The Author John Milton.
Paradise Lost. A Poem in Ten Books. The Author John Milton.
"One of the greatest, most noble and sublime poems which either this age or nation has produced"
Paradise Lost. A Poem in Ten Books. The Author John Milton.

London: S. Simmons, 1669. First Edition. Fifth title page. Small quarto, 19th-century full olive pebbled morocco, gilt armorial crest on front cover (Macclesfield), raised bands, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. Housed in a custom clamshell box. With the arms of the Earls of Macclesfield in gilt on the front cover of the morocco binding by Hatton. Title page with a bit of soiling, skillful paper repairs to outer edge; a few minor marginal tears and repairs to corners of text, rarely touching border only, not text, which is generally clean. Morocco joints rubbed, binding sound and attractive. An exceptionally desirable copy with distinguished provenance from the collection of the Earls of Macclesfield, North Library at Shirburn Castle, renowned for its extensive holdings in the fields of science and early technology, history, travel and the military,

John Dryden referred to Paradise Lost as "one of the greatest, most noble and sublime poems which either this age or nation has produced." Although the tremendously difficult circumstances under which Milton produced the work are legendary— he had been blinded by long years of service as secretary under Cromwell and was in political disfavor after the restoration of Charles II— the troubled printing history of the work is less well known. The publisher Samuel Simmons reluctantly agreed to print a small first edition of 1300 copies, as he was assuming a heavy risk in sponsoring an epic poem, for which no precedent in English publishing had been established. As payment for the first edition, Milton received a total of ten pounds. The many issues of the first edition are distinguishable only by variations in the title page, and all six states of title pages can be found combined with one or another states of preliminary leaves (with or without the printer's note, itself appearing in two different settings—four lines and six lines). This copy bears the fifth cancel title page as described in Pforzheimer Wing M2142. Pforzheimer 718. Wickenheiser 601.
Near Fine (Item #2409)

Price: $45,000