Twenty Years at Hull-House, with Autobiographical Notes

Twenty Years at Hull-House, with Autobiographical Notes. Jane Addams.
Twenty Years at Hull-House, with Autobiographical Notes
Twenty Years at Hull-House, with Autobiographical Notes
Twenty Years at Hull-House, with Autobiographical Notes
Nobel Prize laureate Jane Addams’ autobiography, documenting her advocacy for women
Twenty Years at Hull-House, with Autobiographical Notes

New York: Macmillan, 1910. First edition. Fine book in the exceptionally scarce dust jacket. Red cloth binding with bright gilt to front cover and spine; central color illustration of Hull House to front cover. Top edge gilt; extremely light wear to extremeties. Text block tight; internally clean and complete, with frontispiece, 11 plates, and 51 illustrations. Very Good dust jacket with some chipping and minor tears to edges; ¼ inch loss to crown; ¾ inch snag to front cover with no loss; small circular discoloration to front cover and spine where auction tags were likely removed; minor soiling and foxing. The first known copy in jacket on the market in over 30 years. With laid in Night Lettergram handwritten and signed by Addams in her capacity as President of the Woman’s Peace Party.

Jane Addams’ global advocacy for women’s economic, educational, and social equality made her the first American woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize. In her autobiography Twenty Years at Hull-House, Addams recounts her domestic activism as the founder of the second and most innovative settlement house in the U.S. Originally conceived in 1889 as a space where women of privilege could share their knowledge in humanistic fields such as art, literature, and music with the less fortunate, Hull House rapidly transformed into a community support system where working women could learn practical job skills, obtain medical and legal services, and locate affordable housing. Addams’ two decades working in inner-city Chicago ultimately inspired her to take a global approach to advocacy; and she founded the Women’s League for Peace and Freedom in addition to serving as President of the Woman’s Peace Party. The enclosed Night Lettergram to Elsie M. Hill documents this work, as Addams writes in her hand, “Will you strengthen the appeal to be made next Friday by Ethel Snowden of England and Rosika Schwimmer of Hungary to President Wilson by telegramming him immediately at Washington somewhat as follows: ‘We urge a conference of neutral nations dedicated to finding a just settlement of this war.’ Jane Addams, President, Woman’s Peace Party.”

Krichmar 4411.
(Item #2023)

Price: $1,500