The Author's Original Typed Manuscript for "Journey in the Dark."

The Author's Original Typed Manuscript for "Journey in the Dark." Martin Flavin.
The Author's Original Typed Manuscript for "Journey in the Dark."
The Author's Original Typed Manuscript for "Journey in the Dark."
The Author's Original Typed Manuscript for "Journey in the Dark."
The Author's Original Typed Manuscript for "Journey in the Dark."
The Author's Original Typed Manuscript for "Journey in the Dark."
How many Pulitzer Prize winning manuscripts from the 20th century still remain in private hands?
The Author's Original Typed Manuscript for "Journey in the Dark."

New York: Harper & Brothers, 1941 - 1943. The author's original hand-corrected typescript for his most important work, "Journey in the Dark," which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1944. Donated by Flavin to the US Treasury Department "to help the war financing campaign," with a certificate from "The Books and Authors War Bond Committee" dated May, 1945. This typescript purchased by or for Seton Hill College in Greensburg, PA, as printed on the certificate.

A note in the author's hand reads as follows: "This is the original MS of "Journey in The Dark," as I wrote it at the rate of about 500 words a day between April 1941 and July 1943. I compose on a typewriter, and though I may write a page a dozen times, when I finally leave it, it is finished. Indeed, long before this book was finished, it was going into galleys. I use loose leaf paper - keeping the work in binders as it progresses. Martin Flavin | May 15th 1944."

Two cover sheets typed by the publisher with the title and list of other works by Flavin precede the typescript. Dedication page typed by the author, stamped "Received Aug. 17, 1943." The complete typescript comprises 611 one-sided typed sheets (three-hole punched) with publisher and editor notations throughout. The author's holograph corrections in blue ink on approximately 125 leaves and several other leaves with pencil corrections transferred from the galleys. In addition to grammatical corrections, the author clarifies “why the flak was unalarming,” removes racial references, changes a character's name to Mr. Ginsberg from Mr. Bergman, and deletes a page and a half aside about American apathy towards WWII up until the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

How many Pulitzer Prize winning manuscripts from the 20th century still remain in private hands?
(Item #1098)

Price: $12,500